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Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Child and Maternal Health

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Summary (continued)


Availability of Full Report

The full evidence report from which this summary was taken was prepared for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) by the University of Ottawa Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-02-0021. Printed copies may be obtained free of charge from the AHRQ Publications Clearinghouse by calling 800-358-9295. Requesters should ask for Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 118, Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Child and Maternal Health.

The Evidence Report is also online on the National Library of Medicine Bookshelf, or can be downloaded as a PDF File (3.3 MB). PDF Help.

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References

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54. Helland IB, Saugstad OD, Smith L, et al. Similar effects on infants of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids supplementation to pregnant and lactating women. Pediatrics 2001; 108(5):E82.

55. Smuts CM, Huang M, Mundy D, et al. A randomized trial of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation during the third trimester of pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol 2003; 101(3):469-79.

56. Malcolm CA, Hamilton R, McCulloch DL, et al. Scotopic electroretinogram in term infants born of mothers supplemented with docosahexaenoic acid during pregnancy. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2003; 44(8):3685-91.

57. Smuts CM, Borod E, Peeples JM, et al. High-DHA eggs: feasibility as a means to enhance circulating DHA in mother and infant. Lipids 2003; 38(4):407-14.

58. de Groot RH, Hornstra G, van Houwelingen AC, et al. Effect of alpha-linolenic acid supplementation during pregnancy on maternal and neonatal polyunsaturated fatty acid status and pregnancy outcome. Am J Clin Nutr 2004; 79(2):251-60.

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74. Xiang M, Alfven G, Blennow M, et al. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in human milk and brain growth during early infancy. Acta Paediatr 2000; 89(2):142-47.

75. Carlson SE, Rhodes PG, Rao VS, et al. Effect of fish oil supplementation on the n-3 fatty acid content of red blood cell membranes in preterm infants. Pediatr Res 1987; 21(5):507-10.

76. Carlson SE, Cooke RJ, Werkman SH, et al. First year growth of preterm infants fed standard compared to marine oil n-3 supplemented formula. Lipids 1992; 27(11):901-7.

77. Faldella G, Govoni M, Alessandroni R, et al. Visual evoked potentials and dietary long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in preterm infants. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 1996; 75(2):F108-F112.

78. Lapillonne A, Picaud JC, Chirouze V, et al. Supplementation of preterm formulas (PTF) with a low EPA fish oil: Effect on polyunsaturated fatty acids(PUfatty acidsS) status and growth. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1997; 24(4).

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80. Martinez FE, Santos MMd, Sieber VM, et al. Growth and nitrogen balance in preterm infants fed formula with long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Nutr Res 1999; 19(10):1497-505.

81. Ghebremeskel K, Burns L, Costeloe K, et al. Plasma vitamin A and E in preterm babies fed on breast milk or formula milk with or without long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 1999; 69(2):83-91.

82. Bougle D, Denise P, Vimard F, et al. Early neurological and neuropsychological development of the preterm infant and polyunsaturated fatty acids supply. Clin Neurophysiol 1999; 110(8):1363-70.

83. Boue C, Combe N, Billeaud C, et al. Nutritional implications of trans fatty acids during perinatal period, in French pregnant women. Lipids, fats and oils: opportunities and responsibilities in the New Century 2001; 8(1):68-72.

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85. Carlson SE, Werkman SH, Tolley EA. Effect of long-chain n-3 fatty acid supplementation on visual acuity and growth of preterm infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Am J Clin Nutr 1996; 63(5):687-97.

86. Ponder DL, Innis SM, Benson JD, et al. Docosahexaenoic acid status of term infants fed breast milk or infant formula containing soy oil or corn oil. Pediatr Res 1992; 32(6):683-8.

87. Makrides M, Neumann M, Simmer K, et al. Are long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids essential nutrients in infancy? [comment]. Lancet 1995; 345(8963):1463-8.

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94. Jensen CL, Prager TC, Fraley JK, et al. Effect of dietary linoleic/alpha-linolenic acid ratio on growth and visual function of term infants [comment]. J Pediatr 1997; 131(2):200-9.

95. Makrides M, Neumann MA, Jeffrey B, et al. A randomized trial of different ratios of linoleic to alpha-linolenic acid in the diet of term infants: effects on visual function and growth [comment]. Am J Clin Nutr 2000; 71(1):120-9.

96. Lapillonne A. Erythrocyte fatty acid composition in term infants fed human milk or a formula enriched with a low eicosapentanoic acid fish oil for 4 months. Eur J Pediatr 2000; 159(1-2):49-53.

97. Morris G, Moorcraft J, Mountjoy A, et al. A novel infant formula milk with added long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids from singlecell sources: a study of growth, satisfaction and health. Eur J Clin Nutr 2000; 54(12):883-6.

98. Auestad N, Halter R, Hall RT, et al. Growth and development in term infants fed long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: a double-masked, randomized, parallel, prospective, multivariate study. Pediatrics 2001; 108(2):372-81.

99. Guesnet P. Blood lipid concentrations of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids at birth determine their relative postnatal changes in term infants fed breast milk or formula [comment]. Am J Clin Nutr 1999; 70(2):292-8.

100. Innis SM, Gilley J, Werker J. Are human milk long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids related to visual and neural development in breast-fed term infants? J Pediatr 2001; 139(4):532-8.

101. Gibson RA, Neumann MA, Makrides M. Effect of increasing breast milk docosahexaenoic acid on plasma and erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acids and neural indices of exclusively breast fed infants. Eur J Clin Nutr 1997; 51(9):578-84.

102. Agostoni C, Marangoni F, Giovannini M, et al. Prolonged breastfeeding (six months or more) and milk fat content at six months are associated with higher developmental scores at one year of age within a breast-fed population. Adv Exp Med Biol 2001; 501:137-41.

103. Wezel-Meijler G, van der Knaap MS, Huisman J, et al. Dietary supplementation of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in preterm infants: effects on cerebral maturation. Acta Paediatr 2002; 91(9):942-50.

104. Agostoni C, Trojan S, Bellu R, et al. Neurodevelopmental quotient of healthy term infants at 4 months and feeding practice: the role of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Pediatr Res 1995; 38(2):262-6.

105. Cheruku SR, Montgomery-Downs HE, Farkas SL, et al. Higher maternal plasma docosahexaenoic acid during pregnancy is associated with more mature neonatal sleep-state patterning. Am J Clin Nutr 2002; 76(3):608-13.

106. Krasevec JM, Jones PJ, Cabrera-Hernandez A, et al. Maternal and infant essential fatty acid status in Havana, Cuba. Am J Clin Nutr 2002; 76(4):834-44.

107. Jorgensen MH, Hernell O, Hughes EL, et al. Is there a relation between docosahexaenoic acid concentration in mothers' milk and visual development in term infants? J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2001; 32(3):293-6.

108. Williams C, Birch EE, Emmett PM, et al. Stereoacuity at age 3.5 y in children born full-term is associated with prenatal and postnatal dietary factors: a report from a population-based cohort study. Am J Clin Nutr 2001; 73(2):316-22.

109. Baker PN. Possible dietary measures in the prevention of preeclampsia and eclampsia [Review] [73 refs]. Baillieres Clin Obstet Gynaecol 1995; 9(3):497-507.

110. Carlson SE, Ford AJ, Werkman SH, et al. Visual acuity and fatty acid status of term infants fed human milk and formulas with and without docosahexaenoate and arachidonate from egg yolk lecithin. Pediatr Res 1996; 39(5):882-8.

111. Birch E, Birch D, Hoffman D, et al. Breast-feeding and optimal visual development. J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 1993; 30(1):33-8.

112. Leaf A, Gosbell A, McKenzie L, et al. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and visual function in preterm infants. Early Hum Dev 1996; 45(1-2):35-53.

113. Makrides M, Simmer K, Goggin M, et al. Erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid correlates with the visual response of healthy, term infants. Pediatr Res 1993; 33(4 Pt 1):425-7.

114. Innis SM, Nelson CM, Rioux MF, et al. Development of visual acuity in relation to plasma and erythrocyte omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in healthy term gestation infants. Am J Clin Nutr 1994; 60(3):347-52.

115. Jorgensen MH, Hernell O, Lund P, et al. Visual acuity and erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid status in breast-fed and formula-fed term infants during the first four months of life. Lipids 1996; 31(1):99-105.

116. Su HM, Huang MC, Saad NM, et al. Fetal baboons convert 18:3n-3 to 22:6n-3 in vivo. A stable isotope tracer study. J Lipid Res 2001; 42(4):581-86.

117. Lucas A, Stafford M, Morley R, et al. Efficacy and safety of longchain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation of infant-formula milk: a randomised trial [comment]. Lancet 1999; 354(9194):1948-54.

118. Ghys A, Bakker E, Hornstra G, et al. Red blood cell and plasma phospholipid arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid levels at birth and cognitive development at 4 years of age. Early Hum Dev 2002; 69(1-2):83-90.

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Current as of August 2005

 

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