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The John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Sciences: Request for Proposal (Continued)

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Contents
Section 1: PDF Files
Section 2: Forms
Section 3: Tables
Section 4: Frames
Section 5: Scripts, Plug-ins, Applets
Section 6: Non-Text Elements
Section 7: Image Maps
Section 8: Multi-media
Section 9: Color
Section 10: Navigation and Design
Section 11: Style Sheets
Tips for Testing

Attachment 8  - Web Accessibility Checklist

This checklist can be used to review each Web page on public Web sites, Extranets, or Intranets for compliance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. A review can be conducted in anywhere from 5 to 20 minutes, depending on the complexity of the page, and the review process will go faster for successive pages. It is designed to help you do a section-by-section analysis and validate the standards for Web-based resources required by the Access Board: http://www.access-board.gov/sec508/standards.htm


General:

1. Web Site: ____________________________  
URL address: _________________________________

2. Best description or purpose of page:

[  ] Web home page
[  ] Information page
[  ] Online form
[  ] Search page

Search results page

 [  ] FAQ page
 [  ] Policy page
 [  ] Employment listings
 [  ] Graphics page (i.e. maps, photographs, etc.)
 [  ] Web-based application
 [  ] Interface page for multi-media
 [  ] Other (describe): ____________________________________________________

3. Is this an Internet, Intranet, or Extranet page?

 [  ] Internet (Public access)
 [  ] Intranet (Internal access, behind firewall)
 [  ] Extranet (Deployed over Internet but with restricted access to limited user group)

4. On a monthly basis, what are your visitor sessions?

 Number of monthly visits ________
 [  ] Do not track usage


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Section 1: PDF Files

A PDF file must be properly tagged for accessibility and rendered correctly by an assistive technology (AT) device. If a PDF file cannot not be properly tagged or rendered, by an AT device, then an alternative format must be provided. The alternative format for internet Web pages is HTML, TXT, or RTF.

Issues: PDF is a graphical format and assistive technology devices cannot correctly interpret the information unless properly tagged for accessibility. Alternative formats must provide meaningful information that is equivalent to the original document.

How to Test: Use a screen-reader to determine if the information is correctly interpreted. Validate the content in the alternative format to insure it is equivalent to the original content and updated if any changes are made to the original file.

5. Have you provided an alternative format for PDF files such as HTML, TXT, or RTF formats?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not include PDF files

6. Have you provided a link to the appropriate plug-in (PDF Help)?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not include PDF files

 

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Section 2: Forms

Forms that are to be completed on-line must allow assistive technologies to take direction and cues from the form's information, field element completion, and submission of the form.

Issues: Forms must provide adequate information and purpose for a user to fill out the form. Form fields must be accessible and navigable through the form. If a form has a 'timed out' feature, the user must be notified of this constraint up front and a provision must be made to allow the user to request additional time to complete the form.

How to Test: Check that there is adequate information provided for a user to complete the form. Check for proper tab order. The tabbing order is to be through the form first, then natural order tabbing. Check for proper form markup so that forms can interpret the form fields correctly.

7. Do all form fields have a <LABEL> tag?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this pages does not use form fields

8. Do all form fields have a tabindex attribute?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this pages does not use form fields

9. Do your forms fields allow a person using assistive technology to access information, field elements, and functionality for completion and submission of the form including all directions and cues?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ Yes, but... not tested for usability with assistive technology
c. ___ Yes, but... not sure it complies with all the accessibility requirements despite testing
d. ___ No
e. ___ N/A, this page does not use form fields

10. If your form fields are inaccessible to people with disabilities is there an alternative accessible form or a link to an accessible form?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not use form fields

 

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Section 3: Tables

Tables are to be constructed so that all users can interpret the original intent of the author. Row and column headers must be identified for data tables. Associate data cells with their headers for all tables that have two or more logical levels of row or column headers.

Issues:  Tables need to be properly marked-up using HTML 4.x or higher coding standards.  Tabular tables need to be summarized to convey information and an overview of the table's content. Current assistive technology devices do not adequately read HTML 4.x code, but future versions will be designed to interpret table tags and attributes.

How to Test: Check for 'summary' attribute in the Table tag. The 'summary' tag is only visible to the assistive technology device and not the visual user. Check for the Caption tag; this is optional but does provide a title to the table. Check for the headers and id attributes. If the headers and id attributes are not used, then check for the 'scope' attribute and the 'row' and 'col' elements. For a complex table, use the 'axis' attribute. The 'axis' attribute can only be used with 'id' and 'headers' attributes. It will not work with the 'scope' attribute.

11. If you use tables for design layout, have you checked to see if the tables read in a linear method?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, I do not use tables for design layout

12. Do your tabular tables use the 'summary' attribute and/or tag?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, I do not use tabular tables

13. Does each table cell provide identification of row and column headers?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not use tables

 

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Section 4: Frames

Frameset should not require the user to depend on visual cues to navigate the site. Frames must be titled for frame identification and navigation.

Issues: Frames need meaningful descriptive text for navigation. Include the Name attribute because assistive technology devices may or may not read the Title attribute. Some assistive technology devices default to the Src attribute if the Name attribute is missing.

How to Test: Check for 'title' attribute and tag with descriptive text for each frame. The Name attribute requires meaningful text for navigation, but not as descriptive as the Title attribute.

15. Does each frame use the "title" attribute to properly describe the frame?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not contain frames

 

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Section 5: Scripts, Plug-ins, Applets

Pages utilizing scripting languages to display content or to create interface elements must provide meaningful text that can be read by assistive technology. If meaningful text cannot be rendered, then the page must provide an equivalent alternative. A link to a plug-in or applet that complies with §1194.21 (Software Applications and Operating Systems) must be present when a component of a Web page requires an applet, plug-in, or other application to be present.

Issues:  Assistive technology devices may not support scripts, applets, or plug-ins causing the assistive technology device to not convey meaningful information to the user. Plug-ins or applications may not be accessible to assistive technology devices. If a script, applet, plug-in, or application cannot be compliant, then provide a text-only page that is updated when the original content is updated.

How to Test: Use an assistive technology device to check scripts for equivalent content. Check to see if <applets> or <OBJECT> have an 'alt' attribute to provide equivalent information. Provide a direct link to the most current plug-in for download. Use an assistive technology device to check an application for equivalent content.

16. If the page uses scripts, is the script accessible to the screen reader or is there equivalent text provided?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not use scripts

17. Do your applets, such as a JAVA applet, contain the same information and functionality in an accessible format?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A. this page does not use applets

18. If you use a plug-in, such as Flash, Windows Media, Real Audio, etc., have you provided a link to download the plug-in?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not use plug-ins

19. If you require a plug-in, does the plug-in comply with Section 508, 1194.21 (Software Applications and Operating Systems)?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not use plug-ins

20. If you have an application or tool, is it accessible or is an alternative provided that contains the same information and functionality in an accessible format?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not use applications

 

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Section 6: Non-Text Elements

Non-text elements that provide information require a descriptive text equivalent for meaningful content or to facilitate navigation, e.g., images, graphs, charts, animation, etc.

Issues: Assistive Technology devices cannot provide meaningful information about non-text elements without equivalent descriptive text. If more information is required to convey meaningful content, then use the 'longdesc' attribute of D-Link. The 'longdesc' attribute is not supported by I.E. 6.x, Netscape 6.x, AOL 7.0 or less, but use it to prevent future remediation of the Web page.

How to Test: Review the source code for 'alt' attribute for images. Verify link provided by the 'longdesc' attribute and D-Link. Check images (including animation) by placing the mouse over the image. Check for equivalent and meaningful descriptive for the image.

21. Do all non-text elements have text equivalent descriptions using the "alt" attribute or an alternative method for equivalent description?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, there are no non-text elements on this page

 

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Section 7: Image Maps

Client-side image maps are to be used in place of server-side image maps, except when the regions cannot be defined with an available geometric shape. Server-side image maps must provide redundant text links for the image map hot spots.

Issues: Assistive technology devices cannot read server-side image maps because they are external to the HTML document. Client-side image maps must provide equivalent text of the images including text links for all hot spots.

How to Test: Check code the 'alt' attribute in the <IMG> and <AREA> tags. Check for 'usemap' (client-side) as opposed to 'ismap' (server-side) attributes. Verify that all links work. If image cannot be compliant, then check to make sure that there is a text-only equivalent.

22. Does your page have duplicate text links for all links within the server-side image?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A. this page does not have server-side images

23. Do you have a timetable to replace your server-side images with client-side images?

a. ___ Yes, will change to client-side images by: ___________
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not have server-side images

24. Do your client-side images use the "alt" attribute to provide text equivalent description and/or an alternative method to provide text equivalent description?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ Yes/No, some non-text elements have text equivalents, but not all
c. ___ No
d. ___ N/A, this page does not have client-side images

 

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Section 8: Multi-media

For all training and informational video and multimedia productions, regardless of format, provide synchronized video captioning and/or audio description for video and audio output.

  • Speech or other audio information necessary for the comprehension of the content shall be open or closed captioned.
  • Visual information necessary for the comprehension of the content shall be audio described.

Issues: Visually impaired users cannot interpret the video content without some equivalent option. Audible-impaired users cannot interpret audio content without some equivalent content. If a Web page uses a player or plug-in to render multimedia, then a link must be provided for that player or plug-in per section §1194.21 (Software Applications and Operating Systems), players and plug-ins must be accessible.

How to Test: Check for video captioning and audio description. Check for link to player or plug-in. Check with vendor for player or plug-in conformance to Section 508 requirements.

25. Is text captioning provided for audible output and audible output provided for visual information?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, there is no multimedia content on this page

26. If you have multimedia content, is the audible and video output synchronized to the dynamic content?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ Yes/No, audible output is synchronized to important video information
c. ___ Yes/No, text captioning is synchronized to audible output
d. ___ No
e. ___ N/A, there is no multimedia content on this page

 

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Section 9: Color

Web pages should not depend on color for information or navigation of a Web page.

Issues: Users with low vision or who are colorblind may not be able to correctly read text of certain font sizes or color (i.e., normal red text), distinguish among navigation or control buttons on Web pages that use color (e.g., select the green button), or read text or features on Web pages if the background and foreground colors are too close in contrast.

How to Test: Check the Web page using a monochrome monitor or by printing the page with the setting to gray scale.

Check the page using a high contrast setting such as white on black.

27. Are you able to navigate or understand the page without the use of color?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No

 

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Section 10: Navigation and Design

Provide a method that will allow users of assistive technology devices the option to skip repetitive links. Design pages that do not cause screen flicker or blink a frequency between 2 HZ (2 times per second) and 55 Hz (55 times per second). If a Web page cannot be compliant, then provide a text-only page that is equivalent and updated when the non-compliant page is updated. Use descriptive text for links and "Go to" or "Select" instead of "Click here" or "More…" with lengthy URL or mailto addresses.

Issues: Repetitive links can be confusing and irritating to users with assistive technology devices when going from page to page. Screen flicker on Web pages, within certain frequencies, can cause fatigue and seizure. A text-only page alternative is costly to maintain and should be considered only if you cannot make a page compliant. Multiple "Click here" or "More..." links do not convey enough information to users of screen or Braille readers to distinguish between the links and they do not have a mouse to click. Lengthy URL and mailto addresses can be confusing because readers interpret the information in the context of whole words. A text link provides more information to the visual and adaptive technology user.

How to Test: Check for a pixel, transparent, gif, or text link to allow users of assistive technology devices to move to the main content of the page. Look for screen flicker and blinking animated gifs. Ensure that the text-only page is accessible and that it has information equivalent to the original document. Check for "Click here" and "More…" links.

28. Do your pages provide a method for assistive technology to skip repetitive links including navigational links?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not need navigational or repetitive links

29. Have you replaced "Click here" and "More…" links with "Go to," "Select," or "Visit" descriptive headings or URLs?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No

30. If your page requires a fixed time for response before the page 'times out', is the user alerted that he or she will be timed out and given sufficient time to indicate that more time is needed?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A. this page does not have a 'time out' feature

31. Does the "include content," such as applets, plug-ins, or animation, cause the screen to flicker with a frequency greater than 2 Hz or less than 55 Hz?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No

32. If this page cannot be made accessible, do you have a 'text only' version that is updated the same time the inaccessible page is updated?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page is accessible

 

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Section 11: Style Sheets

Content on a Web page must use layout that allows the page to be readable without a style sheet.

Issues: A Web page using a style sheet is not properly rendered when the style sheet is not used or not supported by a browser. Content on pages may appear to be layered on top of each other.

How to Test: Turn off style sheets in the browser. Put the style sheet on a separate page to test for proper reading. Check for absolute positioning instead of relative positioning. Ensure that accommodations are made for various browsers.

33. If the page has style sheets, is it viewable by a user's browser that does not support style sheets?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not have style sheets

34. Does the style sheet interfere with style sheets set by the user's browser?

a. ___ Yes
b. ___ No
c. ___ N/A, this page does not have style sheets

 

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Tips for Testing

Automated validation methods are generally rapid and convenient but cannot identify all accessibility issues. Human review can help ensure clarity of language and ease of navigation.

Use the following method for validating your Web pages:

1. Review your code using HTML 4.01 coding practices. HTML 4.01 code can be checked and validated at the W3C HTML Validation site (http://validator.w3.org/). This site does not check your code or Web page for accessibility.

2. Use an assistive technology device to determine whether information can be interpreted correctly on the Web page.

Screen Readers:

  • IBM Home Reader 3.0 (http://www.ibm.com)
  • JAWS for Windows (http://www.freedomscientific.com/)
  • Window-Eyes (http://www.GWmicro.com/)

3. Use W3C's CSS Validation Service (http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/) for validating your style sheets. This validates code only, not accessibility.

4. Test the Web pages with the keyboard only; rather than an event-driven device (mouse, etc).

5. Test the Web pages with sounds, graphics, and style sheets turned off.

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Current as of May 2008

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