Job, family, and other factors play a role in nurses quitting their jobs and how much they work

Research Activities, March 2010, No. 355

Nurses who are satisfied with their current position and whose organization supports them in a variety of ways are more likely to want to stay in their jobs. Desire to quit a job is also positively linked to higher levels of education, working in smaller metropolitan areas, ease of finding another job, and work-family conflict, according to a new study. Nursing researchers sent out 4,000 surveys to nurses randomly selected in 29 States and the District of Columbia. All of the nurses were female, under 65 years of age, and worked in nonrural areas. A total of 1,907 nurses responded to the first survey in 2003, with 1,348 nurses also responding to the shorter survey in 2004.

Nurses with young children had less likelihood of working at the same job a year later. They were also less likely to be working full-time. However, nurses educated outside the U.S. had an increased likelihood of working at the same job a year later. This was also true for nurses with a higher predicted wage. For every unit increase in the market wage, the probability that the nurse would remain working at the same job increased 23 percent. Finally, having paid time off and medical insurance increased the probability that a nurse would work full-time. The study was supported in part by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (HS11320).

See "Predictors of RNs' intent to work and work decisions 1 year later in a U.S. national sample," by Carol S. Brewer, Ph.D., R.N., Christine T. Kovner, Ph.D., R.N., William Greene, Ph.D., and Ying Cheng, M.A., in the International Journal of Nursing Studies 46, pp. 940-856, 2009.

Current as of March 2010
Internet Citation: Job, family, and other factors play a role in nurses quitting their jobs and how much they work: Research Activities, March 2010, No. 355. March 2010. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://archive.ahrq.gov/news/newsletters/research-activities/mar10/0310RA19.html