Prostate cancer deaths drop, but blacks still most likely to die

Research Activities, November 2010, No. 363

American men with prostate cancer were 25 percent less likely to die from the disease in 2006 than they were in 1999, according to the latest News and Numbers from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The Agency found that the rate at which American men died from prostate cancer declined from 23.5 deaths to 13 deaths per 100,000 males during the period.

The analysis also shows that following changes:

  • Compared with white men, black men were still more than twice as likely to die from prostate cancer in 2006 just as they were in 1999, 69 to 50.5 deaths and 29 deaths to 22 deaths per 100,000 males, respectively, during the period.
  • The rate for Hispanics and Asian-American Pacific Islanders declined from 23 to 18 and from 17 to 14, respectively, per 100,000 males.
  • Men aged 65 and older were 20 percent less likely to succumb to prostate cancer in 2006 compared with 1999. Their rate plummeted from 205 deaths to 164 deaths per 100,000 males.

This AHRQ News and Numbers is based on information in "Prostate Cancer Deaths per 100,000 Male Population per Year," table 1_4_2 appendix in AHRQ's 2009 National Healthcare Disparities Report (). The report examines the disparities in Americans' access to and quality of health care, with breakdowns by race, ethnicity, age, income, education, and other factors.

For more information, contact Bob.Isquith@ahrq.hhs.gov (301) 427-1539.

Current as of November 2010
Internet Citation: Prostate cancer deaths drop, but blacks still most likely to die: Research Activities, November 2010, No. 363. November 2010. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://archive.ahrq.gov/news/newsletters/research-activities/nov10/1110RA28.html