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Medication Side Effects, Injuries, Up Dramatically

AHRQ News and Numbers, April 13, 2011

AHRQ News and Numbers provides statistical highlights on the use and cost of health services and health insurance in the United States.

The number of people treated in U.S. hospitals for illnesses and injuries from taking medicines jumped 52 percent between 2004 and 2008—from 1.2 million to 1.9 million—according to the latest News and Numbers from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). These medication side effects and injuries resulted from taking or being given the wrong medicine or dosage.

The Federal agency also found that in 2008:

  • The top five categories of medicines that together sent more than 838,000 people to emergency departments for treatment and release were: unspecified medicines (261,600); pain killers (118,100), antibiotics (95,100), tranquilizers and antidepressants (79,300), and corticosteroids and other hormones (71,400).
  • For patients admitted to the hospital, the top five categories causing side effects and injuries were corticosteroids (used for such illnesses as asthma, arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and other conditions—283,700 cases), painkillers (269,400), blood-thinners (218,800), drugs to treat cancer and immune system disorders (234,300), and heart and blood pressure medicines (191,300).
  • More than half (53 percent) of hospitalized patients treated for side effects or other medication-related injuries were age 65 or older, 30 percent were 45 to 64, 14 percent were between 18 and 44, and 3 percent were under age 18. Children and teenagers accounted for 22 percent of emergency cases.
  • About 57 percent of the hospitalized patients and 61 percent of emergency department cases were female.

This AHRQ News and Numbers is based on data in Medication-related Adverse Outcomes in U.S. Hospitals and Emergency Departments, 2008. The report uses data from the Agency's 2008 Nationwide Inpatient Sample and 2008 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample. For information about these two AHRQ databases, go to http://www.ahrq.gov/data/hcup/datahcup.htm.

For other information, or to speak with an AHRQ data expert, please contact Bob Isquith at Bob.Isquith@ahrq.hhs.gov or call (301) 427-1539.

Current as of April 2011
Internet Citation: Medication Side Effects, Injuries, Up Dramatically: AHRQ News and Numbers, April 13, 2011. April 2011. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://archive.ahrq.gov/news/newsroom/news-and-numbers/041311.html

 

The information on this page is archived and provided for reference purposes only.

 

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