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Disparities Widen in the Use of Asthma Medications

AHRQ News and Numbers, May 5, 2010

AHRQ News and Numbers provides statistical highlights on the use and cost of health services and health insurance in the United States.

The gap between the proportion of Black and White Americans with asthma who took an inhaled or oral medicine daily to prevent attacks grew wider between 2003 and 2006, according to the latest News and Numbers from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

The Federal agency found that there was no significant difference in the use of daily asthma medicine between the two groups in 2003 (29 percent of Black Americans, compared with 30 percent of White Americans). By 2006, the proportion of Blacks who reported taking daily asthma medicine had fallen to 25 percent, while 34 percent of Whites reported taking it.

According to other findings in the analysis:

  • The gap between Hispanic and White asthma sufferers who reported daily use of medicine also widened from 2003 to 2006. Roughly 28 percent of Hispanics and 31 percent of Whites reporting taking medicine daily for asthma in 2003. In 2006, the number of Hispanics taking the drugs decreased to 23 percent, while the number of Whites taking them increased to 35 percent.
  • From 2003 to 2006, the gap in use of asthma medications closed between higher- and lower-income people who took asthma medications.
  • During the same period, the gap also closed between people who didn't finish high school and those with higher levels of education.

Asthma attacks can interrupt normal daily activities by cause wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, difficulty talking, and other effects. Daily long-term medication to control the disease is necessary to prevent attacks for all people with persistent asthma.

This AHRQ News and Numbers summary is based on data from pages 74 and 75 in the , which examines the disparities in Americans' access to and quality of health care, with breakdowns by race, ethnicity, income, and education.

For other information, or to speak with an AHRQ data expert, please contact Bob Isquith at Bob.Isquith@ahrq.hhs.gov or call (301) 427-1539.

Current as of May 2010
Internet Citation: Disparities Widen in the Use of Asthma Medications: AHRQ News and Numbers, May 5, 2010. May 2010. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://archive.ahrq.gov/news/newsroom/news-and-numbers/050510.html

 

The information on this page is archived and provided for reference purposes only.

 

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