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Clinicians respond more positively to an electronic health record over

Research Activities, October 2009, No. 350

Clinicians respond more positively to an electronic health record over time

How clinicians respond to the implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) system often determines its long-term success and viability. According to a new study, primary care clinicians develop increasingly positive perceptions following implementation of an EHR system. For this study, 86 primary care clinicians were surveyed, including physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. All worked at three health centers that transitioned from paper record systems to an EHR system between June and November 2006. Participants were surveyed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months following implementation of the system.

After using the system for 1 month, 63 percent of clinicians agreed that the EHR improved quality of care. This increased to 86 percent at the end of 1 year. There was also growing agreement that the EHR reduced medication-related errors (72 to 81 percent of clinicians), improved followup of test results (62 to 87 percent), and communication among providers (72 to 93 percent). At the end of 12 months, fewer clinicians reported a worsening in the quality of patient-physician interactions (49 to 33 percent). The majority of clinicians (92 percent) believed that the EHR improved access to a patient's clinical information. This percentage remained consistent from month 1 to month 12. The study was supported in part by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (HS15226).

See "Trends in primary care clinician perceptions of a new electronic health record," by Robert El-Kareh, M.D., Tejal K. Gandhi, M.D., M.P.H., Eric G. Poon, M.D., M.P.H., and others, in the 2009 Journal of General Internal Medicine 24(4), pp. 464-468.

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Current as of October 2009
Internet Citation: Clinicians respond more positively to an electronic health record over: Research Activities, October 2009, No. 350. October 2009. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://archive.ahrq.gov/news/research-activities/oct09/1009RA22.html