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Strategies and Tools for Meeting the Needs of Children

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Pediatric Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Resource; PTDPR

Slide Presentation by George L. Foltin, M.D., F.A.A.P., F.A.C.E.P.


On January 11, 2006,  Dr. Foltin made a presentation in a Web Conference entitled Pediatric Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Resource; PTDPR. This is the text version of Dr. Foltin's slide presentation. Select to access the PowerPoint® slides (174 KB).


Slide 1

Pediatric Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Resource; PTDPR

George L. Foltin, M.D., F.A.A.P., F.A.C.E.P.
Director
Center for Pediatric Emergency Medicine
NYU School of Medicine/Bellevue Hospital
New York City, New York

Slide 2

What Is the Pediatric Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Resource, PTDPR?

  • American Academy of Pediatrics [AAP] Project funded by AHRQ [Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality].
  • AAP in partnership with the Center for Pediatric Emergency Medicine [CPEM] at NYU School of Medicine.
  • Lead Editors: George Foltin, M.D., David Schonfeld, M.D., and Michael Shannon, M.D.
  • Delivered to AHRQ on November 30.
  • Plans for Distribution ongoing.

Slide 3

What Is the Pediatric Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Resource, PTDPR?

  • Comprehensive pediatric reference on preparedness for acts of terrorism: includes slides, handouts, and lecture outlines.
  • Content experts from around the country were recruited to develop training materials.
  • Covers clinical and policy issues.
  • Designed to allow access of critical and essential background information.
  • Save time while facilitating planning efforts.

Slide 4

Why Was the PTDPR Created?

  • Lack of available pediatric-specific resources or clinical guidelines.
  • Unavailability of pediatric resources in the community or on the Internet.
  • Save time for those facilitating pediatric planning efforts.

Slide 5

Pediatric Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Resource; PTDPR

Table of Contents

  • How Children Are Different.
  • System Issues: Preparedness Primer for the Pediatrician.
  • Biological Terrorism.
  • Chemical Weapons and Terrorism.
  • Nuclear Terrorism.
  • Blast Terrorism.
  • Mental Health Issues.
  • Integrating This Resource into Your Practice.

Slide 6

Pediatric Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Resource; PTDPR

Appendices

  • Glossary: definitions of key words.
  • Formulary: list of critical medications.
  • Key points of each section.
  • Critical Web Links: Web sites related to chapter/section.
  • Illustrations and pictures.
  • Articles: key references.
  • AAP statements: full text or Web-linked.
  • Parent EMS [Emergency Medical Services] handouts; home emergency prep plan or kit.
  • Materials for non-pediatrician practitioners: tables covering vital signs, developmental differences, equipment differences.
  • TIPS: Algorithms, treatment/triage task analyses (based on critical chapter content).
  • Hurricane Katrina: Lessons Learned.

Slide 7

Pediatric Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Resource; PTDPR

Figure 9: PTDPR Decon Shower: Child

A drawing shows an adult in a hazmat suit accompanying two children as they shower in a decontamination tent. Arrows indicate that the children enter one end of the tent and exit the other, where an adult waits with a hospital-style gown in hand.

Figure 10: PTDPR Decon Shower: Infant

A drawing shows two adults in hazmat suits assisting two infants on a wheeled table as they shower in a decontamination tent. Arrows indicate that the infants enter one end of the tent and exit the other, where an adult waits with a towel and wipes in hand.

Slide 8

Pediatric Disaster Tool Kit

  • NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
  • Hursa Funding.
  • Pediatric Disaster Advisory Group.
  • Hospital Guidelines for Pediatrics in Disasters.
  • "Resources for General Hospitals."

Slide 9

Pediatric Disaster Tool Kit

  • Sections.
  • Introduction.
  • Security.
  • Dietary.
  • Space and Equipment.
  • Training.
  • Transportation.
  • Staffing.
  • Decontamination.
  • Pharmacy.
  • Psychosocial slash Ethical.

Slide 10

For Further Information

  • E-mail George Foltin at gf16@nyu.edu.
  • Visit CPEM Web site at www.cpem.org.
  • Visit AAP at www.aap.org.
  • Visit AHRQ at www.ahrq.gov.
  • Visit HRSA [Health Resources and Services Administration] at www.hrsa.gov.

Current as of August 2006


Internet Citation:

Pediatric Terrorism and Disaster Preparedness Resource; PTDPR. Text version of a slide presentation at a Web conference. August 2006. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://www.ahrq.gov/news/ulp/btpediatric/foltintxt.htm


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