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  1. Linking Quality of Home Care to Stakeholder Perspectives
  2. Quality for Whom?
  3. Quality 'Riddle' in Long-Term Care
  4. Problems with Existing Satisfaction Measures
  5. Dimensions of Home Care Satisfaction Identified in Focus Groups
  6. Home Care Satisfaction Measure (HCSM)
  7. Current Applications
  8. Home Care Satisfaction Measure: Homemaker Service
  9. Consumers vs. Professional Definitions of Quality
  10. Often the Food is So Bad I Do Not Eat It
  11. Satisfaction Benchmark
  12. Revised 1999 HCSM Benchmarks
  13. Reports and Findings
  14. Graphical Profile of Home Care Satisfaction Measure (HCSM) Results
  15. Displaying Comparative Case Management Outcomes
  16. Interpretation of Results
  17. Summary Program and Policy Uses


The title of this slide is 'Linking Quality of Home Care to Stakeholder Perspectives', a presentation by Scott Miyake Geron of the Boston University School of Social Work, given at the AHRQ-NGA meeting, State Long-Term Care Systems: Reducing Cost, Quality and Access, held in Indianapolis, IN, May 6-8, 2002

Notes:

Linking Quality of Home Care to Stakeholder Perspectives, a presentation by Scott Miyake Geron of the Boston University School of Social Work, given at the AHRQ-NGA meeting, State Long-Term Care Systems: Reducing Cost, Quality and Access, held in Indianapolis, IN, May 6-8, 2002. My research in the past few years has been directed at developing quality indicators. They are often called consumer satisfaction measures, but I think that is inappropriate. Satisfaction is often misunderstood, and measurements reflect that misunderstanding.

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