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Cost

This compilation of tables and figures shows information on health insurance coverage, cost of care and coverage, and access to care and coverage for people 55-64 years of age.

Expenditures by Health Condition

Table 8. Mean expenditures by health condition and self-reported health status for adults insured throughout 2006.

Condition/Health StatusAges
25-34
Ages
55-64
MeanMean
All persons3,4126,251*
Asthma7,15110,310*
Cancer11,46312,357
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease5,1009,916*
Depression7,15611,656*
Diabetes8,13611,114*
Heart disease9,42112,066*
Hypertension6,8258,189*
Any chronic condition4,9517,377*
Trauma4,9588,418*
No chronic condition1,3911,692
Self-reported health: excellent/very good/good2,6954,850*
Self-reported health: fair/poor10,51513,665*

Source: 2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey—Household Component
* indicates that the estimates for ages 25-54 and 55-64 are statistically different at the 5% level. Expenditures are reported for individuals with a condition. Individuals with more than one condition are included in the means for each condition.

  • Overall, near-elderly adults had much higher mean medical expenditures than younger adults (Table 8).
  • Mean expenditures for individuals with particular chronic conditions, except cancer, were higher for near-elderly individuals than for younger individuals.

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Non-Group Premiums

Table 9. Premiums in the non-group health insurance market (in 2006 dollars) using pooled data from 2004-2006

Policies# PoliciesStandard
Error
Mean PremiumStandard
Error
All policies5,824,599286,4133,770137
Single policies4,011,844219,7252,909128
Family policies1,812,754142,3555,675280
Single policies: Age 0-391,761,440165,4071,71498
Single policies: Age 40-541,153,92998,7863,570*262
Single policies: Age 55-59569,42064,0403,911*349
Single policies: Age 60-64527,05564,2684,374*358
Family policies: Age 0-44818,18791,5774,275265
Family policies: Age 45-54589,35370,5226,088*318
Family policies: Age 55-64405,21557,7117,901*860

Source: 2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey—Household Component
* indicates that the estimate is significantly different from that for the lowest age category.

  • In the 2004-2006 period, there were on average 5.8 million policies per year purchased in the non-group (individual) insurance market, covering 9.1 million persons.
  • There were 4.0 million single policies with a mean premium of $2,909 (Table 9).
  • There were 1.8 million family policies covering 5.1 million individuals with a mean premium of $5,675.
  • For single policies, policyholders aged 40-54 ($3,570), policyholders aged 55-59 ($3,911), and policyholders aged 60-64 ($4,374) had premiums that were significantly higher than policyholders aged 0-39 ($1,714). The differences in mean premiums for policyholders aged 40-54 and 55-59 and for policyholders aged 55-59 and 60-64 were not statistically significant.
  • For family policies, policyholders aged 45-54 ($6,088), and policyholders aged 55-64 ($7,901) had premiums that were significantly higher than policyholders aged 0-44 ($4,275).

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Financial Burdens

Go to Appendix Table A1 for more detailed information on this chart. Financial burden refers to people who have out-of-pocket costs for medical care and premiums that exceed 10% of the family's after-tax income.

  • Near-elderly individuals were consistently at greater risk of living with high financial burdens than adults ages 25-44, regardless of their insurance status (Figure 5).
  • Near-elderly individuals and those ages 45-54 with private nongroup coverage had similarly high burdens.

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Page last reviewed May 2009
Internet Citation: Cost. May 2009. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. http://archive.ahrq.gov/policymakers/health-initiatives/meps/mepsneareld/neareld2.html

 

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