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Hospital Preparedness Exercises Atlas

Public Health Emergency Preparedness

This resource was part of AHRQ's Public Health Emergency Preparedness program, which was discontinued on June 30, 2011, in a realignment of Federal efforts.

This information is for reference purposes only. It was current when produced and may now be outdated. Archive material is no longer maintained, and some links may not work. Persons with disabilities having difficulty accessing this information should contact us at: https://info.ahrq.gov. Let us know the nature of the problem, the Web address of what you want, and your contact information.

Please go to www.ahrq.gov for current information.

Section II: Resources and Tools Alphabetical Listings

The Resources and Tools Alphabetical Listings includes detailed information about each resource and/or tool. After referring to Section I or Section III, users can look up the resource and/or tool (listed in alphabetical order for easy reference) to find detailed information about that item.

Note: The Hospital Preparedness Exercises Atlas of Resources and Tools has only basic information on how to plan, conduct, and evaluate exercises, and how to comply with accreditation standards and Federal guidelines. For more information these topics, please refer to the Hospital Preparedness Exercises Guidebook.

How to Interpret the Listings

Below is an example of a listing. Each listing has four sections. For more information on how terms in each listing are defined and how to interpret the listing, please refer to the corresponding section number following the example.

Example of a Listing

Oval: 1Acronym List (HSEEP) RT

Oval: 2√Foundation √Design and Development √Conduct √Evaluation √Improvement Planning
Discussion-Based Exercise Operations-Based Exercise

Oval: 3

Author: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP)
Publication Date: 2007
Length: 3 pages
Location: http://hseep.dhs.gov/HSEEP_Vols/upl/DocServe.aspx?dload=%27hseep_Vol4%2fVol+IV+Docs%2f682_Acronym+List+(Reviewed+tms).doc
Hospital-Specific: No
Target Audience: Emergency Management Staff Aiming To Be HSEEP Compliant
Users: Exercise Staff, Exercise Participants
Uses:

  • Can be customized to fit needs of exercise.
  • Can be included in exercise documentation for participants, controllers and evaluators.
  • Can be used for familiarization with common HSEEP acronyms.
Description: This list includes acronyms from the HSEEP volumes frequently used in exercise documentation. It can easily be modified to fit the needs of a specific exercise and/or documents, by adding or deleting acronyms.

Oval: 4

Quick Reference

Accreditation Org.: N/A

Federal:
√HSEEP

NHPP Overarching Req.: Exercises, Evaluation, Correct.

NHPP Sub-Capabilities: All

Exercise Scenario: All

Format:
Glossary Template

Oval: 1

The first section of each listing includes the title of each resource and/or tool. Following the title, there may be one or more of the following symbols:

  • R indicates that this is a resource, a document that can serve as a reference for planning, conducting, or evaluating hospital preparedness exercises.
  • T indicates that this is a tool, such as a form, template, or survey, to be used to help perform particular tasks.
  • $ indicates that the resource and/or tool is available for purchase.
  • lock symbol indicates that this resource and/or tool requires login access.
  • indicates that the resource or tool can be used to directly achieve compliance.
Oval: 2

The second section of each listing includes two rows: Row 1: Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) Exercise Phases; Row 2: Exercise Type.

Row 1: HSEEP Exercise Phases
In the first row, the five HSEEP exercise phases are listed: 1) Foundation; 2) Design & Development; 3) Conduct; 4) Evaluation; and 5) Improvement Planning.1 (For full description of HSEEP, please refer to Part II: HSEEP Methodology of the Hospital Preparedness Exercises Guidebook.) If the phase is black and bold, the resource and/or tool may be used during that phase. If there is a √ next to the phase, the resource or tool is primarily used in that respective phase. The √, helps users quickly identify which resources and/or tools are critical for completing that specific phase. When a √ is not present next to a phase, but the phase is in black, bold print, this indicates that the resource and/or tool has a particular use in that phase, but the usage is secondary (e.g., for review purposes).
Example: An Improvement Plan Template may be adapted for use during the Improvement Planning phase, so that phase will be bolded with a √ next to that phase name. However the Improvement Plan Template is also bolded for the Foundation and Design and Development phases, without a √ to remind Hospital Preparedness Planners that the document needs to be reviewed in those phases.

Row 2: Exercise Type
In the second row are two exercise types: 1) Discussion-Based; 2) Operations-Based. If the exercise type is black and bold, the resource or tool was developed to be used for that type of exercise.

Discussion-based exercises primarily involve conversation among players, e.g., Tabletop Exercises that are conducted in a conference room.

Operations-based: exercises are conducted on-site and involve actions by players, e.g., full-scale exercises that are conducted in the field.


1 A brief definition of the five HSEEP phases:

  • Foundation: In HSEEP methodology, this is the first phase and involves laying the groundwork for an emergency preparedness exercise plan. This includes developing a support base, forming an exercise planning team, conducting planning conferences, and creating an exercise timeline.
  • Design & Development: This phase involves defining exercise objectives, developing scenarios, deciding exercise logistics, preparing necessary documentation, and planning exercise conduct.
  • Conduct: This phase involves the execution of the exercise, and includes pre-exercise activities (e.g. setup); the actual exercise; and post-exercise/wrap-up activities.
  • Evaluation: This phase involves assessing the performance of the exercise and specifically determining what objectives were met and to what proficiency.
  • Improvement Planning: This phase uses lessons learned and best practices from the exercise in order to improve the hospital's emergency management program.

Oval: 3

The third section of each listing includes the citation information for each resource and/or tool and detailed information about the tool and how to use it in the exercise process. The following information is found in this section.

  • Author. Includes funding sources for development of the resource and/or tool.
  • Publication Date.
  • Length. Indicates page length or viewing time.
  • Location. How to access a tool, usually a Web site.
  • Hospital-Specific. “Yes” indicates created specifically for hospitals. “No” indicates created for a general audience, or a relevant stakeholder (e.g. fire, police, public health department). A “no” here does not necessarily indicate that the resource and/or tool is not of use to a hospital. Many non-hospital-specific tools may be useful in a hospital. This is an indication of how much modification may be needed when using the tool.
  • Target Audience. The specific audience for the resource and/or tool, if any (e.g., hospitals, public health departments).
  • User. The exercise planners/players most likely to use this resource and/or tool (e.g., exercise planning team, evaluator).
  • Uses. Ways this resource and/or tool can be used in the exercise process.
  • Description. A brief abstract on how the resource and/or tool can be used.
Oval: 4

The fourth section of each listing is the Quick Reference bar on the right. Users can scan the Quick Reference bar for important information.

Accreditation Organization
If the resource or tool is relevant to meeting the standards of any of the following accreditation organizations, the accreditation organization will be listed:

  • Joint Commission
  • American Osteopathic Association (AOA)
  • Det Norske Veritas (DNV)

A √ next to the accreditation organization means that the resource or tool can be used to directly achieve compliance.

Federal

If the resource or tool has relevance to meeting the standards or guidance of anyof the following programs or agencies, that name will be listed:

  • Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)
  • Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP)
  • National Incident Management System (NIMS)
  • Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA)

A √ next to the Federal program or agency means that this resource and/or tool can be used to directly achieve compliance with funding requirements.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Hospital Preparedness Program NHPP Overarching Requirements
If the resource and/or tool has relevance to NHPP overarching requirements, the respective requirement will be listed:

  • National Incident Management System
  • Education & Preparedness Training
  • Exercises, Evaluation & Corrective Actions
  • Needs of At Risk Populations

For more information on the overarching requirements, please refer to Chapter 3: Federal Requirements of Hospital Preparedness Exercises Guidebook.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Hospital Preparedness Program NHPP Sub-Capabilities
If the resource or tool has relevance to NHPP sub-capabilities, the respective capability will be listed:

Level I

  • Interoperable Communications System
  • Bed Tracking System
  • Emergency System for the Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP)
  • Fatality Management Plans
  • Hospital Evacuation Plans

Level II

  • Alternate Care Sites (ACS)
  • Mobile Medical Assets
  • Pharmaceutical Caches
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Decontamination (Decon)

For more information on the sub-capabilities, please refer to Chapter 3: Federal Requirements of Hospital Preparedness Exercises Guidebook.

Scenario
Indicates the scenario described in the document listed. Resources and/or tools may be listed under more than one scenario. Resources and/or tools may be categorized under the following scenarios:

  • General
  • Agricultural
  • Biological & Bioterrorism
  • CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosive)
  • Chemical
  • Communicable Disease
  • Explosive
  • Isolation
  • Mass Casualty
  • Mass Prophylaxis
  • Natural Disaster
  • Nuclear
  • Pandemic Flu
  • Pediatrics
  • Psychosocial
  • Radiological
  • Recovery
  • Staff Fatigue
  • Strategic National Stockpile (SNS)
  • Surge Capacity
  • Terrorism
  • Transportation
  • Triage
  • Unannounced Exercise2

Format
Indicates the format of document listed. Resources and/or tools may be listed as more than one format.

  • Agenda: A list of suggested topics that may be covered in a meeting or conference.
  • Assessment: A document that can be used to evaluate the preparedness of a certain aspect of a system (e.g. how strong the communications system is in the health care organization).
  • Badges: Templates that can be used to create identification for exercise participants.
  • Briefings: Documents, usually in a presentation format that can used to provide exercise participants information about an exercise prior to exercise play.
  • Checklist: A list of items that may be completed or obtained during exercise planning, conduct, or evaluation.
  • Debriefings: Documents, usually in a presentation format that can be used to elicit information from exercise participants about an exercise after exercise play.
  • Diagram: Figures that can be used in the exercise planning process and while conducting an exercise to determine exercise logistics.
  • Emergency Operations Plans (EOPs): Documents that can be used to develop or modify EOPs.
  • Example: A resource or tool that provides an example of exercise procedures, plans, and scenarios that can be either imitated or modified in other exercises.
  • Exercise Evaluation Guide (EEG): The HSEEP format for evaluating exercises, which assists in providing evaluation standards and guidelines for observing exercises, collecting data, analyzing evaluation data, and writing up reports.
  • Fact Sheet: Short documents that provide basic information on a particular topic. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are included in this category.
  • Form: Document that allows the user to fill out information.
  • Glossary: Document that includes a list of terms related to the exercise process or a particular exercise.
  • Guidebook: An instructional manual that explains a procedure or how something works. Documents classified as “manuals” are included in this category.
  • Improvement Plan (IP): The HSEEP format for recording the evaluation of the exercise, critical events, the strengths of exercise player response, areas for improvement, and recommendations for corrective actions.
  • Labels: Templates that can be used to create identification for exercise participants.
  • Minutes: Templates that can be used to record the minutes of what occurred in each meeting.
  • Model: Often a computer simulation of a particular aspect of scenario; used to enhance the realism of an exercise.
  • Multimedia/DVDs: Resources and/or tools in an electronic multimedia or video (DVD) format.
  • Org. Chart (Organizational Chart): Diagrams of the structure of an organization or a particular aspect of an organization.
  • Policy: Any policies related to exercise play.
  • Presentation: Document, often created in PowerPoint, used to provide information to an audience.
  • Schedule: Document related to creating exercise schedules for planning, conducting, or evaluating an exercise.
  • Situation Manual (SitMan): The HSEEP format of a playbook that is used during a discussion-based exercise.
  • Survey: A document, often in questionnaire form, used to collect information about a particular topic.
  • Symptomology Tags: Tags that can be used to label/identify symptoms of exercise participants.
  • Table: Document that has information presented in a tabular format.
  • Template: A pre-formatted version of a tool that can be modified to fit the needs of an exercise.
  • Timeline: Any documents related to creating exercise timelines related to planning, conducting, or evaluating an exercise.
  • Toolkit: Document that contains a variety of tools and resources that can be used in the exercise process.
  • Training Materials: Documents that can be used to train hospital staff in a particular capability.
  • Waivers: Documents that can be used as release form templates for exercise participants.
  • Web-Based Software: Resource and/or tool in a software format, available over the internet.

2 An unannounced exercise is technically not a scenario, but is placed here for categorical purposes.


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