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2008 State Snapshots: Web Conference Presentation

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On July 9, 2009, Keely Cofrin Allen made a presentation in a Web Conference entitled Utah's State Snapshots. This is the text version of the event's slide presentation. Please select the following link to access the slides: (PowerPoint® File, 708 KB).

Slides: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16


Slide 1: Utah's State Snapshots

Keely Cofrin Allen, Ph.D., Director
Office of Health Care Statistics, Utah Department of Health
State Snapshots Web Conference
July 9, 2009

In the lower left corner is the logo for Utah Health Data Committee, which is a modified caduceus (symbol often used to represent medicine in the U.S.) with "Utah Health Data Committee" on the right side.

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Slide 2: Utah's Population Overview

  • Population: 2,500,000+.
  •  76% live along the Wasatch Front.
  • Youngest population & highest birth rate.
  • Uninsured rate: 10.7% (2008).
  • Medicaid enrolled: 240,000, or 9%.
  • Median household income: $56,000 (13th).

In the upper right corner is a map of Utah.

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Slide 3: Utah Health Data Authority Act

26-33a-104
The purpose of the committee is to direct a statewide effort to collect, analyze, and distribute health care data to facilitate the promotion and accessibility of quality and cost-effective health care and also to facilitate interaction among those with concern for health care issues. (adopted 1990)

In the upper right is an image of three overlapping circles representing cost, quality/patient safety, and access.

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Slide 4: Health Data Committee

  • Purchasers/Business:
    • Clark Hinckley, Zions Bancorporation
    • Stephen Kroes, Utah Foundation
    • Jim Wall, Deseret News
  • Providers:
    • Kim Bateman, M.D., Manti Medical Clinic and HealthInsight
    • Kevin Martin, R.N., Orem Community Hospital
  • Public Policy:
    • Robert Huefner — Chair, Univ. of Utah, Political Sciences
    • Leslie Francis, Univ. of Utah, Health Ethics
  • Patients/Consumers:
    • Gary Nordoff, Housing for Low Income People
    • Terry Haven, Voices for Utah Children
    • Bill Crim, United Way
  • Payers and Health Systems:
    • David Call, Deseret Mutual Benefits Administration
    • Douglas Hasbrouck, Regence BC/BS of Utah
    • Greg Poulsen, Vice-chair, Intermountain Healthcare

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Slide 5: Office of Health Care Statistics

  • Established in 1990 as staff to the Health Data Committee
  • Collects facility data on:
    • Hospitals
    • Emergency departments
    • Ambulatory surgery centers
  • Collects quality data on:
    • HMOs
    • PPOs
    • Medicaid/CHIP
  • All payer database

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Slide 6: Reporting for Policymakers

  • The big picture from a national perspective
  • Comparative summary indicators:
    • State ranking
    • Trend
  • Multiple health settings
  • Tie to state health priorities
  • Identify emerging issues

An image of the cover of the report Challenges in Utah's Health Care, June 2007, is located in the lower right.

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Slide 7:Utah Health News

The slide is a screenshot of the Utah Health News page in the Utah Department of Health Web site The shot is of an article published June 11, 2007, entitled, "Utah 1 of 8 States Rated 'Strong' in New Health Care Report."

UDOH released the report on the same day as AHRQ released the National Healthcare Quality Report.

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Slide 8: Report Indicators from AHRQ

16 summary indicators in the report:

  • 13 used national data or methods:
    • 8 — AHRQ
    • 2 - CMS Health Care Expenditure Report
    • 1 - NCHS Hospital Survey
    • 1 - NCQA HEDIS
    • 1 - United Health Foundation
  • 2 used Utah data and NYU methods (Access)
  • used Utah data and methods (Rx data)

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Slide 9: Utah's Overall Health Care Quality Performance Compared to All States

This slide contains an image of a semi-circle labeled "Performance Meter: All Measures." The semi-circle is divided into five even segments of red, orange, yellow, light green, and green with the corresponding labels: very weak, weak, average, strong, and very strong. A dotted arrow, which indicates the baseline year, is on the line dividing the average and strong sections, and a solid arrow, which indicates the most recent data year, is in the strong segment.

Source: State Snapshots Report

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Slide 10: Highlighting Strengths and Weaknesses

  • Low-performing measures can be targeted for improvement

There is an image of a semi-circle labeled "Performance Meter: Heart Disease Measures." The semi-circle is divided into five even segments of red, orange, yellow, light green, and green with the corresponding labels: very weak, weak, average, strong, and very strong. A dotted arrow, which indicates the baseline year, and a solid arrow, which indicates the most recent data year, are both in the weak section.

  • These measures may show what we're doing right

There is an image of a semi-circle labeled "Performance Meter: Home Health Care Measures." The semi-circle is divided into five even segments of red, orange, yellow, light green, and green with the corresponding labels: very weak, weak, average, strong, and very strong. A dotted arrow, which indicates the baseline year, and a solid arrow, which indicates the most recent data year, are both located in the very strong segment.

  • Average measures should be watched for trends

There is an image of a semi-circle labeled "Performance Meter: Preventative Measures." The semi-circle is divided into five even segments of red, orange, yellow, light green, and green with the corresponding labels: very weak, weak, average, strong, and very strong. A dotted arrow, which indicates the baseline year and a solid arrow, which indicates the most recent data year, are both located in the average segment.

Source: State Snapshots Report

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Slide 11: Why is Utah's Health Care Moving in the Right Direction?

  • Utah has strong health care systems. Good and stable performance is observed in all areas of quality, patient safety, access, and cost.

Summary Indicator Tables

Challenges in Utah's Health Care Report

Area Highlights
Quality/Patient Safety

Overall health care quality ranked as “Strong” (p.9)

Established baseline measures for hospital patient safety (p.11)

Access

Decline in uninsured ED visits for primary care sensitive conditions (PCSC) but increased percent of visits for the general population, 2001 to 2005 (p.17)

Stable hospitalization rates for ambulatory care sensitive conditions over past decade (p.18)

Cost

Decline in proportion of personal health care expenditures for hospitals and nursing homes and increased proportion of expenditures for home health care, 1980 to 2004 (p. 21)

Slower increase in median charge for hospitalizations over 2004 but similar to the national trend (p. 23)

Stable utilization rates of hospitals, emergency departments, and outpatient surgery centers, 1999 to 2005 (p. 24)

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Slide 12: State Ranking Dynamics

Commonwealth Fund Health System Report Card (2007), released 06/13/07

Rank Access Quality Avoidable hospital
use & cost
Equity Healthy
lives
Utah 38 48 1 42 1

An image of the cover of the Commonwealth Fund's report, Aiming Higher, is in the upper left.

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Slide 13: Ranking Dynamics (cont.)

  • Dr. Sundwall, Exec. Director led the investigation:
    • Are the data comparable?
    • Are the methods comparable?
    • Are the indicators comparable?
    • What can we learn from the Commonwealth Fund report?
  • The Utah Medical Ethics Committee (UMEC) had a rich discussion on August 28, 2007

An image of Dr. Sundwall in the upper right corner.

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Slide 14: UMEC Summary

  • The distinction between outcome measures and process measures was evident in the various ranking schemes.
  • The nation seems to be at a point where our measure definitions are standardized but the validity of each specific measure can't be taken for granted.

A logo for the Utah Department of Health, which consists of a green triangle with the profile of a man's, woman's, and child's heads, is located in the upper right corner.

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Slide 15: Take Home Message

  • Interaction between policymakers and analysts is the starting point for evidence-based policymaking
  • Fully explore the State Snapshots to understand the indicators and methods
  • Play with AHRQ's other tools, such as HCUPnet, to find additional data
  • Ask AHRQ for technical assistance if HCUPnet doesn't have the data you need

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Slide 16: Thank You!

Keely Cofrin Allen
kcofrinallen@utah.gov

The Utah Health Data Committee caduceus is in the lower right.

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