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National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2003

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Data Sources: Miscellaneous and Multisource Sponsors


2001 California Health Interview Survey

Sponsor

The California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) is a collaborative project of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, the California Department of Health Services, and the Public Health Institute. The 2001 California Health Interview (CHIS 2001) was funded by the California Department of Health Services, the National Cancer Institute, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the California Commission for Children and Families, The California Endowment, and the California branch of the Indian Health Services.

Mode of Administration

CHIS 2001 is a population-based RDD telephone survey. It is composed of three core surveys: the Adult Survey, the Adolescent Survey, and Child Survey. The Adult Survey was for respondents aged 18 and older. All adult respondents responded on their own behalf except for the elderly who were too frail to participate. Proxies, mostly family members, were interviewed on behalf of the frail elderly. The Adolescent Survey was for teens aged between 12 and 17 who responded to the interviews directly. However, questions of their health insurance coverage were asked of the adult in the household who gave permission to interview the adolescent. The Child Survey was for children aged 0-11 and the interview was conducted with the adult in the household who was most knowledgeable of the child.

Survey Sample Design

CHIS 2001 is a representative sample of the California population. It is a two-stage, geographically stratified random-digit-dial (RDD) sample design.

At the first stage, California telephone numbers were randomly generated by computer and then a random sample of these were drawn within each of 41 predefined geographic areas or "strata" (33 strata are individual counties and 8 strata are groupings of counties with small population sizes). These telephone numbers were then dialed and screened to determine if they were households and thus eligible for the survey.

At the second stage, one adult was randomly selected to be interviewed from among all adults living in the contacted household. Only the selected person was eligible for the interview. In households where there were children associated with the selected adult, one adolescent (age 12-17) was interviewed and information was obtained for one child under age 12 by interviewing the adult most knowledgeable about that child's health care. Both the child and adolescent were each randomly chosen if more than one child or adolescent resided in the household and with whom the selected adult was "associated" as either a parent or guardian.

Because a minimum sample size goal of 800 adult interviews was set for each stratum, CHIS 2001 over-sampled counties with small populations and as a result over-sampled rural areas. Sample size goals larger than 800 (ranging from 1,000 to 2,660) were set for counties with larger population sizes. The largest county sample, over 11,000 adult interviews, was allocated to Los Angeles County. Additionally, supplemental geographic samples were collected in three cities (Berkeley, Long Beach, Pasadena) and in three counties (San Francisco, Santa Barbara, Solano). CHIS 2001 also over-sampled several ethnic minority population groups, supplementing the statewide samples for Koreans, Vietnamese, South Asians, Japanese, American Indian and Alaska Natives, and Cambodians.

Primary Survey Content

CHIS 2001 is an omnibus health survey with extended topic areas in health status, health conditions, cancer control, health insurance, and access to care. Below is a list of general topic areas in each of the three surveys in CHIS 2001.

  1. Adult Survey
    • Physical activity
    • Injury prevention
    • Health status
    • Women's health
    • Health use and access
    • Health conditions
    • Cancer screening
    • Health insurance
    • Health behaviors
    • Dental health
    • Diet
    • Mental health
  2. Adolescent Survey
    • Young women's health
    • Computer use
    • Health status
    • Skin cancer prevention
    • Health conditions
    • Dental health
    • Health care
    • Health behaviors
    • Mental health
    • Sexuality
    • Experience with firearms
    • Diet
    • Injury prevention
    • Physical activity
  3. Child Survey
    • Age, gender, race, ethnicity
    • Physical activity
    • Computer Use
    • Health status
    • Child care
    • Family involvement
    • Health problems
    • Dental health
    • Health care
    • Health behaviors
    • Mental health
    • Health insurance
    • Diet
    • Injury prevention

Population Targeted

CHIS 2001 was designed to provide county-level population estimates as well as population estimates for California as a whole. It was also designed to provide estimates for major race/ethnic groups and a few selected ethnic subgroups.

Demographic Data

Age, race, gender, ethnicity, county of residence, industry, occupation, labor force status, employment earnings, annual household income, household composition, country of birth, and citizenship status.

Years Collected

CHIS is a biannual survey. The first survey is CHIS 2001. CHIS 2003 is scheduled to be fielded in July 2003.

Schedule

Biannual.

Geographic Estimates

State, sub-state regions, and county.

Contact Information

CHIS homepage: http://www.chis.ucla.edu

CHIS toll-free: 866-257-CHIS (866-275-2447)

CHIS email: chis@ucla.edu

Fax: 310-794-2686

Address:

California Health Interview Survey
UCLA Center for Health Policy Research
10911 Weyburn Ave., Suite 300
Los Angeles, CA 90024

References

California Health Interview Survey. CHIS 2001 Methodology Series: Report 1 – Sample Design. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

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The Commonwealth Fund 2001 Health Care Quality Survey

Sponsor

The Commonwealth Fund

Mode of Administration

The Commonwealth Fund 2001 Health Care Quality Survey was a telephone survey conducted in English, Spanish, Mandarin or Cantonese, Vietnamese and Korean.

Survey Sample Design

A stratified minority sample design was used. The survey employed standard list-assisted random-digit dialing methods, and telephone numbers from area code-exchange combinations with higher-than-average densities of minority households were drawn disproportionately.

Primary Survey Content

The survey collected current information on the health care experiences of respondents, including information on health status, use of preventive services, access-to-care issues, experiences with the doctor-patient encounter, communication, health literacy, and compliance.

Population Targeted

The survey is a nationally representative survey of the U.S. adult population age 18 and older. In addition, the survey allows separate analyses of responses by African-American, Hispanic and Asian households.

Demographic Data

Age, gender, race, ethnicity, country of birth, region, primary language spoken, insurance coverage, employment status, marital status, and household composition.

Years Collected

2001

Schedule

NA

Geographic Estimates

National

Contact Information

Commonwealth Fund Web site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org/index.htm

References

Princeton Survey Research Associates. Methodology: Survey on Disparities in Health Care Quality: Spring 2001. Princeton, NJ; February 28 2002.

Collins KS, Hughes D, Doty M, Ives B, Edwards J, Tenney K. Diverse Communities, Common Concerns: Assessing Health Care Quality for Minority Americans: Commonwealth Fund; March 2002.

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