Skip Navigation U.S. Department of Health and Human Services www.hhs.gov
Agency for Healthcare Research Quality www.ahrq.gov
Archive print banner
National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2004

This information is for reference purposes only. It was current when produced and may now be outdated. Archive material is no longer maintained, and some links may not work. Persons with disabilities having difficulty accessing this information should contact us at: https://info.ahrq.gov. Let us know the nature of the problem, the Web address of what you want, and your contact information.

Please go to www.ahrq.gov for current information.

Blacks or African Americans

In the 2003 NHDR, blacks had poorer quality of care than whites for about 60% of quality measures, including not receiving prenatal care and recommended childhood and adult immunizations. In the 2003 NHDR, blacks had worse access to care than whites for about 40% of access measures, including lacking health insurance or a source of ongoing health care, having problems getting referral to a specialist, and rating their health care poorly.

Figure 4.1. Blacks compared with whites in 2000 and 2001 on measures of quality of care (top) and access to care (bottom)

Quality

Figure 4.1a. Blacks compared with whites in 2000 and 2001 on measures of quality of care. Select Full Text Description [D] for details.

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Access

Figure 4.1. Blacks compared with whites in 2000 and 2001 on measures of access to care. Select Full Text Description [D] for details.

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Better = Blacks receive better quality of care or have better access to care than whites.

Same = Blacks and whites receive about the same quality of care or access to care.

Worse = Blacks receive poorer quality of care or have worse access to care than whites.

Source: SEER, USRDS, MEPS, CDC AIDS Surveillance System, NVSS-N, NIS, NHIS, NHDS, 2000-2001.

  • Of the 38 measures of quality with comparable data for 2000 and 2001, blacks received poorer quality of care than whites for about two-thirds of measures in both 2000 and 2001 (Figure 4.1, top).
  • Between 2000 and 2001, only 1 of these 38 measures demonstrated significant improvement among blacks while 2 demonstrated significant deterioration: black children 19-35 months who received 1 dose of varicella vaccine improved while black children 19-35 months who received 3 doses of H. influenzae type B or 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine fell.
  • Of the 31 measures of access with comparable data for 2000 and 2001, blacks had worse access to care than whites for about 40% of measures in both 2000 and 2001 (Figure 4.1, bottom).
  • Between 2000 and 2001, 2 of these 31 measures demonstrated significant improvement among blacks while none deteriorated: blacks who had a source of ongoing care or who were uninsured for a full year both improved between 2000 and 2001.

 

 

The information on this page is archived and provided for reference purposes only.

 

AHRQ Advancing Excellence in Health Care