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National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2004

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Effectiveness

Cancer

Cancer is caused by the uncontrolled multiplication and spread of abnormal cells. Unchecked, cancer can lead to death3. While cancer incidence and death rates are falling4, an estimated 1.4 million people will be diagnosed with cancer and 560,000 will die from cancer in the United States in 20045. Total costs of cancer in 2003 exceeded $189 billion; direct costs for physicians, hospitals, and drugs exceeded $64 billion6. Cancer incidence, mortality, screening, and treatment vary by race and ethnicity7,8; and by SES9,10. Ensuring that all populations have access to appropriate cancer screening services is a core element of reducing cancer health disparities11. Screening for colorectal cancer with fecal occult blood testing or sigmoidoscopy is an effective way of reducing new cases of late stage disease and mortality caused by this cancer.

Figure 2.1. Age-adjusted incidence rate per 100,000 of late stage (regional and distant) colorectal cancer among people 50 and older, by race (top) and ethnicity (bottom), 1992-2001

Figure 2.1. Age-adjusted incidence rate per 100,000 of late stage (regional and distant) colorectal cancer among people 50 and older, by race, 1992-2001. Select Full Text Description [D] for details.

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Figure 2.1. Age-adjusted incidence rate per 100,000 of late stage (regional and distant) colorectal cancer among people 50 and older, by ethnicity, 1992-2001. Select Full Text Description [D] for details.

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, 1992-2001.

Reference Population: People age 50 and older.

Note: For findings related to all cancer measures, go to Tables 2.1a and 2.1b. Available data do not support analyses stratified by SES.

  • For all years from 1992 to 2001, rates of late stage colorectal cancer were higher among blacks compared with whites (Figure 2.1, top). APIs had lower rates compared with whites for all years except 2001. AI/ANs had lower rates compared with whites for all years except 1997 and 1998.
  • For all years from 1992 to 2001, rates of late stage colorectal cancer were lower among Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic whites (Figure 2.1, bottom).
  • Rates of late stage colorectal cancer declined from 1992 to 2001 among whites and non-Hispanic whites.

 

 

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