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National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2004

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Focus on Family-Centered Care

Family-centered care requires providers who spend adequate time with the child, listen carefully to the parent, are sensitive to family values and customs, communicate specific needed health information, and help the family feel like a partner in the child's care.

Figure 4.37. Children with special health care needs without family-centered care by race, ethnicity, income, and parental education, 2001

Figure 4.37. CSHCN without family-centered care by race, ethnicity, income, and parental education, 2001. Select Full Text Description [D] for details.

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Source: National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, 2001.

Reference population: Civilian noninstitutionalized population age 0 to 17 with special health care needs.

Figure 4.38. Children with special health care needs without family-centered care by race (top) and ethnicity (bottom) stratified by income, 2001

Figure 4.38. CSHCN without family-centered care by race stratified by income, 2001. Select Full Text Description [D] for details.

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

 Figure 4.38. CSHCN without family-centered care by ethnicity stratified by income, 2001. Select Full Text Description [D] for details.

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Source: National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, 2001.

Reference population: Civilian noninstitutionalized population age 0 to 17 with special health care needs.

  • In 2001, the proportion of CSHCN reported as not receiving family-centered care was higher among black, Asian, and AI/AN compared with white CSHCN; among Hispanic compared with non-Hispanic white CSHCN; among poor, near poor, and middle income compared with high income CSHCN; and among CSHCN whose parents had less than a high school education compared with CSHCN whose parents had any college education (Figure 4.37).
  • Income explains some but not all of the differences in quality of care among CSHCN by race and ethnicity. For example, although racial and ethnic differences in family-centered care tend to attenuate among CSHCN in high income families, they often persist among the poor and near poor (Figure 4.38).

 

 

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