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National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2005

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Blacks or African Americans

Previous NHDRs showed that Blacks had poorer quality of care and worse access to care than Whites for many measures tracked in the reports. Findings based on 46 core report measures of quality and 8 core report measures of facilitators and barriers to health care are shown below.

Figure 4.1. Blacks compared with Whites on measures of quality and access

Figure 4.1. Blacks compared with Whites on measures of quality and access

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Better: = Blacks receive better quality of care or have better access to care than Whites.

Same: = Blacks and Whites receive about the same quality of care or access to care.

Worse: = Blacks receive poorer quality of care or have worse access to care than Whites.

CRM: = core report measures.

Note: Data presented are the most recent available.

  • For 20 of the 46 core report measures of quality, Blacks had poorer quality of care than Whites (Figure 4.1). Black-White differences ranged from Blacks being over 10 times more likely than Whites to be diagnosed with AIDS to Blacks being 59% less likely than Whites to be given antibiotics for the common cold. The median difference over all of the core report measures was 9% (Blacks 9% more likely than Whites to receive poorer quality care).
  • For 4 of the 8 core report measures of access, Blacks had significantly worse access to care than Whites. Black-White differences ranged from Blacks under age 65 being 17% more likely than Whites to lack health insurance to Blacks being 7% less likely than Whites to report difficulties or delays getting care. The median difference over all of the core report measures was 10% (Blacks 10% more likely than Whites to have worse access to care).

Figure 4.2. Change in Black-White disparities over time

Figure 4.2. Change in Black-White disparities over time

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Improving: = Black-White difference becoming smaller.

Worsening: = Black-White difference becoming larger.

CRM: = core report measures.

Note: The most recent and oldest years of data available are compared.

  • Of core report measures of quality that could be tracked over time for Blacks and Whites, Black-White differences became smaller for 23 measures but larger for 17 measures (Figure 4.2). For 2 measures—late stage breast cancer and postoperative venous thromboembolic event—Black-White differences were no longer statistically significant.
  • Of core report measures of access that could be tracked over time for Blacks and Whites, Black-White differences became smaller for all measures. For 1 measure—being uninsured all year—the Black-White difference was no longer statistically significant.

 

 

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