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National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2005

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Prevention: Cholesterol Screening

High cholesterol is a major risk factor for heart disease. Awareness and control of blood cholesterol can help reduce the risk of heart attack.

Figure 2.9. Adults with blood cholesterol screening in past 5 years by race (top), ethnicity (upper middle), income (lower middle), and education (bottom), 1998 and 2003

Figure 2.9. Adults with blood cholesterol screening in past 5 years by race (top), ethnicity (middle), income (bottom), and education (bottom), 1998 and 2003

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Figure 2.9. Adults with blood cholesterol screening in past 5 years by race (top), ethnicity (middle), income (bottom), and education (bottom), 1998 and 2003

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Figure 2.9. Adults with blood cholesterol screening in past 5 years by race (top), ethnicity (middle), income (bottom), and education (bottom), 1998 and 2003

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Figure 2.9. Adults with blood cholesterol screening in past 5 years by race (top), ethnicity (middle), income (bottom), and education (bottom), 1998 and 2003

[D] Select for Full Text Description.

Key: AI/AN = American Indian or Alaska Native.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 1998, 2003.

Reference population: Civilian noninstitutionalized population age 18 and over.

  • In both 1998 and 2003, the proportion of adults who had their blood cholesterol checked was lower among Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Whites; among poor, near poor, and middle income adults compared with high income adults; and among adults with a high school education or less compared with adults with any college education (Figure 2.9).
  • In 1998, AI/ANs were less likely to receive cholesterol screening compared with Whites. In 2003, Blacks were more likely to receive cholesterol screening compared with Whites.
  • From 1998 to 2003, rates of blood cholesterol screening improved from 67% to 73% for all adults.
  • Significant improvements in screening were observed within all racial, ethnic, income, and education groups except AI/ANs, for which the change did not reach statistical significance.

 

 

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