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National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2005

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Figure 3.4.

Persons under age 65 uninsured all year by race, ethnicity, income, and education, 1999-2002. 4 trend line charts. first chart, race: White, 1999, 11.7 percent, 2000, 12.6 percent, 2001, 13.3 percent, 2002, 13.4 percent; Black, 1999, 15.8 percent, 2000, 16.9 percent, 2001, 13.9 percent, 2002, 13.6 percent. second chart, ethnicity: N H W, 1999, 8.9 percent, 2000, 9.7 percent, 2001, 9.9 percent, 2002, 10.1 percent; Hispanic, 1999, 28.3 percent, 2000, 28.7 percent, 2001, 29.8 percent, 2002, 28.2 percent. third chart, income: Poor, 1999, 21.7 percent, 2000, 24.2 percent, 2001, 24.6 percent, 2002, 24.0 percent, Near Poor, 1999, 23.8, 2000, 24.2 percent, 2001, 24.5 percent, 2002, 24.9 percent, Middle Income, 1999, 11.4 percent, 2000, 13.4 percent, 2001, 12.1 percent, 2002, 15.3 percent, High Income, 1999, 5.4 percent, 2000, 5.5 percent, 2001, 5.7 percent, 2002, 5.2 percent. fourth chart, education: <High School, 1999, 28.5 percent, 2000, 29.7 percent, 2001, 30.8 percent, 2002, 30.2 percent, High School Grad, 1999, 14.9 percent, 2000, 16.4 percent, 2001, 16.6 percent, 2002, 16.8 percent, Some College, 1999, 8.0 percent, 2000, 8.3 percent, 2001, 8.3 percent, 2002, 9.0 percent. Key: N H W = non-Hispanic White. Source: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 1999-2002. Reference population: Civilian noninstitutionalized persons under age 65. Note: In 2002, survey respondents could report more than one race. Racial categories shown here for 2002 exclude multiple race individuals and hence are not directly comparable to earlier years. Estimates for racial groups other than Whites and Blacks are significantly affected by this change and are not shown here.

 

 

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