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2005 National Healthcare Quality Report

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Health Care Quality Continues To Improve at a Modest Pace Across Most Measures of Quality

Most measures of quality demonstrate improvement over the 2004 NHQR:

  • Of the 44 core report measures with trend data, 23 showed significantiii improvement, 2 showed significant deterioration, and 19 stayed the same (Figure H.1).
  • Measures that improved significantly outnumbered those that deteriorated significantly by a large margin of over 10 to 1.
  • A sizable percentage of the measures (43%) showed no significant change.

Figure H.1. Number of NHQR core measures showing significant improvement, no significant change, or deterioration over multiple years (n=44)

Figure H.1. Number of NHQR core measures showing significant improvement, no significant change, or deterioration over multiple years (n=44). Select [D] Text Description for details.

[D] Select for Text Description.

Note: The average annual improvement for each measure is reported here. For trend analyses of the core measures in this report, 3 years of data are presented; for a few, only 2 years are shown; and for others, more than 3 years are presented.

However, the pace of improvement overall is modest. Of the 44 core report measures with trend data:

  • The frequency distribution of the average annual rate of change for all core measures is skewed toward improvement such that there were 36 measures that showed some improvement (significant and not significant) and 8 that deteriorated (Figure H.2).
  • The median rate of annual change for the 44 core measures is a 2.8% improvement. This is the same rate of improvement as reported in the 2004 NHQR.iv
  • Six measures showed annual improvement of more than 10% whereas no measure showed deterioration of greater than 10%.

Figure H.2. Frequency distribution of the number of core measures by annual rate of change (n=44)

Figure H.2. Frequency distribution of the number of core measures by annual rate of change (n=44). Select [D] Text Description for details.

[D] Select for Text Description.

Note: For trend analyses of the core measures in the 2005 reports, 3 or more years of data are available for most measures in the measure sets; for a few, only 2 years are available.

iii Significance is defined as a statistical difference with a p value less than 0.05 and with an average change of 1% or more per year over a period of 2 or more years, depending on the measure. For more detail, go to Chapter 1, Introduction and Methods.
iv Different methods were used to determine the median rate of improvement in this report versus the 2004 report. This year, the NHQR reports on core versus all measures with two data points, annual change versus report-to-report change, and the geometric average versus arithmetic average in determining annual change. For more details, go to Chapter 1, Introduction and Methods.

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Health Care Quality Improvement Is Variable, With Notable Areas of High Performance Key Themes and Highlights From the National Healthcare Quality Report

 

 

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