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National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2013

Chapter 6: Text Descriptions

Figure 6.1. Composite: Adults who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months who reported poor communication with health providers, by race/ethnicity, income, 2002-2010

Race / Ethnicity / Income 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Total 10.8% 9.8% 9.6% 9.7% 9.8% 9.3% 9.5% 9.0% 8.1%
White 9.8% 8.9% 8.7% 8.8% 9.1% 8.6% 8.8% 8.0% 7.3%
Hispanic 15.6% 13.6% 12.2% 11.7% 12.2% 11.8% 10.9% 13.0% 10.8%
Black 11.5% 11.0% 11.0% 12.7% 10.3% 10.5% 12.1% 11.7% 10.2%
Poor 15.7% 15.2% 15.8% 15.0% 13.4% 13.6% 14.1% 15.9% 13.1%
Low Income 12.5% 11.9% 11.0% 11.4% 12.7% 11.8% 12.0% 11.6% 10.7%
Middle Income 11.2% 10.1% 9.8% 10.4% 11.3% 9.2% 9.7% 9.3% 8.0%
High Income 8.9% 7.8% 7.6% 7.4% 7.1% 7.7% 7.4% 6.3% 6.1%

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2002-2010.
Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population age 18 and over who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. White and Black are non-Hispanic. Hispanic includes all races. Patients who report that their health providers sometimes or never listened carefully, explained things clearly, showed respect for what they had to say, or spent enough time with them are considered to have poor communication.

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Figure 6.2. Composite: Adults who had a doctor's office or clinic visit who reported poor communication with health providers, by race/ethnicity, stratified by income, 2010

Income White Black Hispanic
Poor 13.4% 12.8% 12.0%
Low Income 9.3% 13.2% 13.4%
Middle Income 7.3% 8.6% 10.6%
High Income 5.8% 7.7% 7.2%
Total 7.3% 10.2% 10.8%

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2010.
Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population age 18 and over.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. White and Black are non-Hispanic. Hispanic includes all races. Patients who report that their health providers sometimes or never listened carefully, explained things clearly, showed respect for what they had to say, or spent enough time with them are considered to have poor communication.

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Figure 6.3. Composite: Children who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months whose parents reported poor communication with health providers, by race/ethnicity and geographic location, 2002-2010

Race / Ethnicity / Location 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
White 5.6% 4.8% 4.8% 4.4% 4.2% 4.2% 4% 3.6% 3.1%
Black 7.1% 7.5% 6.3% 5.7% 4.8% 5.1% 4% 5.1% 4.3%
Hispanic 10.2% 8.4% 7.9% 8.8% 7% 6.8% 5.8% 7.4% 5.9%
Total 6.7% 6.1% 5.7% 5.5% 4.8% 4.9% 4.4% 4.9% 4%
Large Central MSA 8.2% 6.9% 7.8% 6% 5.1% 5.1% 4.6% 5.7% 4.6%
Large Fringe MSA 5.6% 4.9% 4.5% 4.2% 3.7% 4.4% 3.4% 3.6% 3.2%
Medium MSA 6.4% 6.5% 4.2% 6.7% 5.7% 5.6% 4.9% 4.7% 3.9%
Small MSA 6.9% 6.6% 5.3% 4.4% 4.9% 4.2% 7.1% 6% 4.2%
Micropolitan 6.3% 5.7% 5.7% 6% 5.9% 6.2% 3.2% 4.7% 4.5%
Noncore 6.4% 5.1% 6.3% 6.3% NA% 3.8% NA% 6.1% 3.7%

Key: MSA = metropolitan statistical area.
Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2002-2010.
Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population under age 18 who had a doctor's office or clinic visit in the last 12 months.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. White and Black are non-Hispanic. Hispanic includes all races. Data for children in noncore areas in 2006 and 2008 did not meet criteria for statistical reliability. Parents who report that their child's health providers sometimes or never listened carefully, explained things clearly, showed respect for what they had to say, or spent enough time with them are considered to have poor communication.

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Figure 6.4. Adult hospital patients who reported poor communication with nurses and doctors, by race, 2009-2012

  2009 2010 2011 2012
Poor Communication With Nurses        
White 5.3% 5.0% 4.8% 4.3%
Black 8.0% 7.5% 7.0% 6.6%
Asian 7.2% 6.4% 6.0% 5.5%
NHOPI 7.3% 6.7% 5.6% 5.3%
AI/AN 8.7% 8.0% 7.7% 7.1%
>1 Race 8.1% 7.8% 7.7% 7.3%
Total 5.9% 5.6% 5.3% 4.9%
Poor Communication With Doctors        
White 5.0% 4.9% 4.9% 4.7%
Black 6.0% 5.9% 5.7% 5.6%
Asian 5.5% 5.2% 5.0% 4.7%
NHOPI 5.4% 5.4% 4.5% 4.7%
AI/AN 7.5% 7.2% 7.2% 6.9%
>1 Race 7.4% 7.6% 7.6% 7.6%
Total 5.3% 5.3% 5.2% 5.0%

Key: NHOPI = Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; AI/AN = American Indian or Alaska Native.
Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Hospital CAHPS (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) Survey, 2009-2012.
Denominator: Adult hospital patients.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. Poor communication is defined as responded sometimes or never to the set of survey questions: "During this hospital stay, how often did doctors/nurses treat you with courtesy and respect?" "During this hospital stay, how often did doctors/nurses listen carefully to you?" and "During this hospital stay, how often did doctors/nurses explain things in a way you could understand?"

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Figure 6.5. Provider-patient communication among adults receiving home health care, by race/ethnicity, 2012

Race / Ethnicity Always inform you about when they will arrive Always explain things in a way you can understand Always listen carefully to you Always treat you as gently as possible Always treat you with courtesy and respect
Total 78.8% 82.3% 83.9% 90.0% 93.2%
White 79.5% 83.1% 84.4% 91.0% 94.1%
Black 81.1% 84.2% 86.0% 90.1% 93.2%
Asian 70.1% 71.2% 74.1% 78.7% 83.6%
NHOPI 78.5% 79.7% 81.0% 86.0% 88.6%
AI/AN 76.2% 80.7% 81.9% 88.1% 90.9%
>1 Race 77.5% 82.4% 82.7% 89.1% 92.0%
Hispanic 76.9% 81.4% 85.8% 88.2% 92.5%

Key: NHOPI = Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; AI/AN = American Indian or Alaska Native.
Source: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Home Health Care CAHPS (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems), 2011-2012.
Denominator: Adults who had at least two visits from a Medicare-certified home health agency during a 2-month look-back period. Patients receiving hospice care and who had "maternity" as the primary reason for receiving home health care are excluded.

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Figure 6.6. Adults with limited English proficiency, by whether they had a usual source of care with or without language assistance, Hispanics and non-Hispanics, 2002-2010

Year Hispanics, No USC Hispanics, USC Lang Assist - Yes Hispanics, USC Lang Assist - No Non-Hispanics, No USC Non-Hispanics, USC Lang Assist - Yes Non-Hispanics, USC Lang Assist - No
2002 40.6 48.8 10.6 30.1 44.2 25.7
2003 55.5 40.6 3.9 32.5 50.0 17.6
2004 51.2 43.5 5.3 30.8 56.8 12.4
2005 54.3 43.0 2.7 38.5 49.5 12.0
2006 53.2 41.3 5.5 34.0 55.9 10.1
2007 52.5 44.0 3.5 34.0 42.0 24.0
2008 53.2 44.3 2.5 41.1 41.9 17.0
2009 52.6 43.8 3.6 38.5 46.9 14.6
2010 46.8 50.7 2.4 42.7 46.3 10.7

Key: USC = usual source of care.
Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2002-2010.

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Figure 6.7. Adults age 18 and over who needed an interpreter during last doctor visit (California only), by race/ethnicity and granular ethnicities, 2011

Race / Ethnicity Percent
Non-Hispanic White 0.8
All Asians 3.8
Chinese 6.6
Korean 7.2
Vietnamese 9.6
All Hispanics 9.0
Mexican 9.3
Central American 11.5
South American 6.6

Key: NHW = Non-Hispanic Whites.
Source: University of California, Los Angeles, Center for Health Policy Research, California Health Interview Survey, 2011.
Denominator: Adults with previous doctor visit.
Note: Data were unavailable for Black, AI/AN, NHOPI, multiple-race, Puerto Rican, Filipino, Japanese, and South Asian individuals. Racial groups are non-Hispanic; Hispanic groups include all races.

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Figure 6.8. Adults with a usual source of care whose health providers sometimes or never asked for the patient's help to make treatment decisions, by race/ethnicity and education, 2002-2010

Race / Ethnicity / Education 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Hispanic 27.6% 21.6% 17.2% 20.0% 17.0% 18.5% 18.4% 18.9% 17.7%
Black 26.4% 22.6% 23.4% 20.9% 22.7% 18.9% 17.5% 17.7% 14.9%
White 19.9% 17.5% 16.8% 15.9% 16.1% 14.5% 14.3% 14.2% 11.5%
Total 21.9% 18.9% 17.7% 17.2% 17.3% 15.9% 15.6% 15.4% 13.2%
Any College 19.4% 16.7% 16.2% 16.5% 15.7% 15.0% 14.5% 14.2% 12.0%
High School Grad 22.6% 20.0% 18.8% 18.3% 17.2% 16.0% 16.2% 16.8% 14.6%
< High School 25.9% 23.0% 20.2% 20.3% 20.1% 19.7% 18.7% 19.8% 16.6%

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2002-2010.
Denominator: Civilian noninstitutionalized population with a usual source of care.
Note: For this measure, lower rates are better. White and Black are non-Hispanic. Education status applies to adults age 18 and over.

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Page last reviewed May 2014
Page originally created May 2014
Internet Citation: Chapter 6: Text Descriptions. Content last reviewed May 2014. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. https://archive.ahrq.gov/research/findings/nhqrdr/nhdr13/chap6-txt.html

 

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